Californians and Oklahomans Unite!

Spending the 4thof July in San Diego, California, I am wondering about the source and meaning of negative perceptions of California presented to me in recent months by several people in my home state of Oklahoma.

“California” has long had a mythical quality in large portions of the United States, with the association ranging from admiration and wonder – California as the harbinger of technological and cultural things to come – to bemused skepticism – California as a vortex of religious, culinary and leisure time experimentalism and oddity (from the water bed, advanced as a Master’s thesis project by a student at San Francisco State University in 1968 to the hot tub, initially developed in old wine vats in northern California in the 1960s), and a place that is simply weird.

In discussions over the course of the past year or so, I’ve discovered that for some of my fellow residents of Oklahoma, “California” has come to symbolize everything they despise: excessive regulation, environmental fundamentalism, moral decay and lawlessness (marked by the sanctuary cities movement).

In response I’ve pointed out that California is an extremely dynamic place; that the San Francisco Bay Area, for example, has one of the fastest growing economies in the United States and is a locus of technological innovation that yields tremendous benefits for the entire country.

But rather than seeing my alma mater, UC Berkeley, as the home of the largest number of Nobel Prize winners of any public university in the country (by far, with 69 Nobel laureates; the University of Illinois is second with 24), my interlocutors see it as a haven of intolerance and repression of free speech.

And herein is a clue to the puzzling perceptions I’ve encountered: the politics stoked by the current administration and its supporters have turned bemusement and skepticism over California’s oddities and innovations into a full-blown sense of “otherness.”

Despite California’s pivotal place in the economic, cultural and political fabric of the nation, the political message is to reject the entire state (with its 40 million inhabitants and GDP of $2.5 trillion) as a blight on the country.

The message, that is, is one of division — an effort to rupture the social cohesion of the nation, as I wrote about in my last post.

Of course, there are many inventive, broad-minded Oklahomans who realize their kinship with Californians and the contribution of the state to the national endeavor. And California is itself an extremely diverse place in every way; even those Oklahomans who condemn the state would in fact find much in common with many of their fellow Americans in California were they to spend time here.

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Accordingly, though I do so with skepticism and deep concern about the destructive politics that may unfold in the coming months, I express the hope that this 4thof July marks the nadir of the erosion of social cohesion in the United States.

Students, Teachers and Democratic Accountability

This past week the Governor of Oklahoma and several state legislators pronounced that “you can’t spend what you don’t have” in response to the state’s teacher walkout, about to enter its second week.

As it turns out, the state budget is not chiseled in stone and handed down from on high; it is the product of the actions of the legislators themselves.

The real problem is that legislators are unwilling to raise the resources required to fund education adequately in Oklahoma and several other Republican-governed states, including Kansas, West Virginia, Kentucky and Arizona.

Adequate funding would require that legislators abandon their persistent and pernicious “small government” mantra, and that they place the needs of the people of the state above those of their wealthy corporate donors.

Across the United States, spending per pupil on primary and secondary education is not low by international standards. The U.S. comes out above average in spending per student, and slightly below the OECD average in terms of effort – that is, spending relative to GDP.

The U.S. spends about $11,400 per pupil on public education. Ultimately, the problem for public education in the U.S. is the unevenness of spending across states (as well as across localities within states).

While New York spends $21,200 per student, Utah spends less than $6600. Arizona comes in at $7489 and Oklahoma at $8082. Oklahoma’s spending per pupil is about $1000 less than Slovenia, a European country with GDP per capita not quite half that of Oklahoma.

After a decade of reduced funding for education, lopping off nearly a quarter of funding to education in real terms according to the Oklahoma Policy Institute, Oklahoma legislators in late March passed a $447 million revenue package to fund significant raises for teachers, support staff and state employees.

The Governor and legislators celebrated, considering their work done. Even though they’d fallen far short of the requests of the teachers to also reverse the massive cuts to school funding – so evident in large class sizes, crumbling textbooks and shortages of teachers and supplies alike — they called for teachers to express gratitude.

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Literature textbooks in use at Heavener High School in Heavener, OK, eastern Oklahoma close to the Arkansas border. Photo provided by Sarah Jane Scarberry to pbs.org.

Three elements of the revenue package are especially noteworthy.

First, this was the first tax increase passed by the Oklahoma state legislature in 28 years, the result of a 1992 referendum requiring three-fourths of the legislature to support a tax increase.

Second, the measure disregarded some major potential sources of revenue, such as the personal income tax, which has a top rate that has been cut repeatedly in recent years, and the capital gains tax deduction, which legislators so far contend is “off the table.”

Third, the revenue package materialized after the preparation of a mass teacher walkout. Only the pressure of the walkout produced results that the legislature had staunchly resisted for years.

Oklahoma legislators now express frustration that the teachers have not responded with expressions of gratitude and a return to the classroom. In addition to the Governor, who condescendingly referred to teachers as teenagers wanting a better car, other legislators have voiced visible displeasure with teachers for their persistence in showing up at the state capital in large numbers on behalf of their cause.

Legislators and the Governor also have resorted to the insulting and now reflexive tactic of claiming (with zero evidence) that protestors are paid agitators.

Why this reaction? Frequently reelected without little or no opposition, these legislators are uncomfortable with the concept of democratic accountability.

Though it may make legislators in Oklahoma, West Virginia, Kentucky and Arizona uncomfortable, democratic accountability is on the rise. The courageous Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School students who started the March for Our Lives movement have given new life to accountability.

Teachers have been empowered by students, and state legislators best take heed.