Californians and Oklahomans Unite!

Spending the 4thof July in San Diego, California, I am wondering about the source and meaning of negative perceptions of California presented to me in recent months by several people in my home state of Oklahoma.

“California” has long had a mythical quality in large portions of the United States, with the association ranging from admiration and wonder – California as the harbinger of technological and cultural things to come – to bemused skepticism – California as a vortex of religious, culinary and leisure time experimentalism and oddity (from the water bed, advanced as a Master’s thesis project by a student at San Francisco State University in 1968 to the hot tub, initially developed in old wine vats in northern California in the 1960s), and a place that is simply weird.

In discussions over the course of the past year or so, I’ve discovered that for some of my fellow residents of Oklahoma, “California” has come to symbolize everything they despise: excessive regulation, environmental fundamentalism, moral decay and lawlessness (marked by the sanctuary cities movement).

In response I’ve pointed out that California is an extremely dynamic place; that the San Francisco Bay Area, for example, has one of the fastest growing economies in the United States and is a locus of technological innovation that yields tremendous benefits for the entire country.

But rather than seeing my alma mater, UC Berkeley, as the home of the largest number of Nobel Prize winners of any public university in the country (by far, with 69 Nobel laureates; the University of Illinois is second with 24), my interlocutors see it as a haven of intolerance and repression of free speech.

And herein is a clue to the puzzling perceptions I’ve encountered: the politics stoked by the current administration and its supporters have turned bemusement and skepticism over California’s oddities and innovations into a full-blown sense of “otherness.”

Despite California’s pivotal place in the economic, cultural and political fabric of the nation, the political message is to reject the entire state (with its 40 million inhabitants and GDP of $2.5 trillion) as a blight on the country.

The message, that is, is one of division — an effort to rupture the social cohesion of the nation, as I wrote about in my last post.

Of course, there are many inventive, broad-minded Oklahomans who realize their kinship with Californians and the contribution of the state to the national endeavor. And California is itself an extremely diverse place in every way; even those Oklahomans who condemn the state would in fact find much in common with many of their fellow Americans in California were they to spend time here.

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Accordingly, though I do so with skepticism and deep concern about the destructive politics that may unfold in the coming months, I express the hope that this 4thof July marks the nadir of the erosion of social cohesion in the United States.