The Virtue of Political Accountability

I am in Oslo this week, investigating sustainability issues and government accountability in Norway. While there is no easy comparison between a country of 5.3 million people with low levels of poverty and income inequality and the United States, the contrast in degrees of political accountability could not be starker.

For all its tradition of social democracy through much of the 20th century, Norway is now governed by a right-wing coalition that includes a libertarian/nationalist/populist party advocating strict controls on immigration and asylum-seekers. This includes a Progress Party proposal to essentially criminalize asylum seekers by detaining in secure facilities those arriving without documentation as well as those whose asylum applications are rejected.

Three months ago, Norway’s Justice Minister, Progress Party member Sylvi Listhaug, posted on Facebook comments accusing the opposition Labour Party (Norway’s single largest party) of weakness in combatting terrorism.

Specially, Listhaug wrote that Labour put “terrorist’s rights” above national security.

stortingsbygningensommer840x450fotostortinget.jpg
The Stortinget, Noway’s parliament building

Context makes the remarks particularly offensive, painful and highly inappropriate. Seven years ago, on July 22, 2011, a terrorist attack by a Progress Party supporter targeted a Labour Party youth summer camp in the worst mass shooting in Norway’s post-World War II history. The perpetrator set off a car bomb in central Oslo, killing 8, and then boarded a ferry to the island of Utoya. Impersonating a police officer checking on security in the wake of the car bombing, he spent 90 minutes executing 69 young people for their political affiliation.

What was the political reaction to the March 2018 remarks of Norway’s right-wing Justice Minister?

The opposition parties unified in condemnation of the minister’s comments, vowing to issue a vote of no confidence in the government if Listhaug did not resign.

Although Listhaug resorted to the empty “free speech” defense that has become so tiresome as justification for outrageously uncivil and destructive comments in American politics, she ultimately did resign. Listhaug was free to speak her mind. But she was held accountable for her verbal recklessness.

Accountability is vital for democracy; without it, trust in governing institutions, trust between citizens and the willingness to treat political opponents as loyal fellow citizens evaporates.

Politics in Norway may in recent years have become highly contentious, but a sense of competition between competing policy agendas nonetheless endures.

Perhaps so for Norway, but no longer for the United States.

In U.S. politics, spokespersons for the current administration now say virtually anything, no matter how scurrilous, about anyone – from the Prime Minister of a friendly country to a former U.S. President or Vice President, to elected members of the opposition party, to the policies and role of the Democratic Party, with increasing abandon and zero accountability.

Over time, the ultimate casualty may be democracy itself.

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